Geocode Locations Using Google Maps v3 API and SSIS

I wanted to do a cool experiment on SSIS that I haven’t tried before. I am really interested in this whole mapping component on SSRS, and I know that most likely the biggest challenge of companies is how to geocode addresses that are already in their databases. So what I wanted to do was to try and retrieve lat/long information from public geocoding web services within SSIS.

Please note that the exercise below is purely for experimentation. Please read the restrictions of each of the geocoding services, and go with whichever is appropriate for your purpose.

Also this is a simplistic code to show you how to get the latitude/longitude information. On your own versions, test thoroughly and add the appropriate exception handlers.

Ok, let’s start.

Step 1 – Look for the appropriate geocoding service.

There are few publicly available ones. Some are limited in content, some are very restricted. Check out the summary here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geocoding

For this experiment I am going to use Google Maps v3 API since it’s publicly available, and V3 doesn’t need the Maps API key anymore! Please make sure you read the restrictions of using the Google Maps v3 API before deciding to use it in your applications/systems.

Note that for v3, there are only 2 available output formats: json and xml. Previous version of the API supported other output formats like kml and csv. I am going to stick with XML. (I’ll leave JSON for the next experiment).

Here is an example URL and result: http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/geocode/xml?address=Pacific+West+Outlet,Gilroy,California,US&sensor=false

Try to study the structure, it will help later on with the parsing for latitude and longitude.

Step 2 – Prep your package

Create your SSIS package. Drop a data flow task, and add your source. In my case my source is an OLE DB source pointing to my SQL Server table that has address fields already.


Read the rest of this entry »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 8.8/10 (13 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)

I just wrote a couple of SharePoint posts at the Black Ninja Software blog:

How to Programmatically Impersonate Users in SharePoint
– this post shows how you can programmatically execute code in another user’s context, and you can do this by getting a handle to that user’s UserToken

How to Invoke Javascript Snippets Without Using RegisterClientScriptBlock
– this post shows how to invoke and change Javascript code without needing to register that code. This approach uses asp:Literal

And in case you missed this one:
SharePoint Readiness Checklist – Reposted

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

clip_image002

The Create GUID tool is often found under the Tools menu.

image

The actual binary – guidgen.exe – is supposed to be in

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 8\Common7\Tools

Apparently if you did not install Visual C++ when you were installing Visual Studio 2005, you are not going to get guidgen.exe.

I didn’t install Visual C++ in any of my VMs (trying to conserve space, plus I don’t use it anyway), which explains why my Create GUID tool is missing.

There might be a better way to do (perhaps browse through the Visual Studio 2005 install files?) but my workaround is to copy guidgen.exe from one of my other Visual Studio 2005 installs.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
`